Pokémon Shuffle

Pokémon Shuffle is a match-three game featuring Pokémon. It is free to download and play, but imposes restrictions on play time via Hearts. The game includes in-app purchases whereby real money can be spent on Hearts and power-ups.

Gameplay

Pokémon Shuffle consists of a 6x6 board of Pokémon icons and the aim is to match three or more of the same Pokémon by swapping two icons. Each level in the game is a battle against a wild Pokémon; the more matches made, the more damage is done. As matches are made, those icons are removed and more drop in from above.

Each of the main stages has a set number of moves in which it must be completed. If the Pokémon is defeated within the limit, there is a chance to catch it and add it to your roster. Expert stages (unlocked after doing well on the main stages) instead have a time limit and matches must be made as fast as possible before time runs out.

Five Hearts are provided initially. Each attempt at a level uses one Heart, and each Heart takes 30 minutes to regenerate. A maximum of five Hearts can be regenerated. More Hearts can be bought or received via StreetPass; these are stored in a separate counter so that the regenerating Hearts are always used up first.

Attack

Each Pokémon has a base Attack power. Completing stages earns Pokémon experience points (EXP) and increases their level, increasing their Attack. The maximum is level 10. The charts below list the attack at each level and EXP required.

Types

Like the main Pokémon games each Pokémon has a type. However all Pokémon in Shuffle are single type, so Bulbasaur for example is Grass type rather than Grass/Poison. Most Pokémon follow their first type from the main games, the most notable exception being Normal/Flying Pokémon who are all Flying type in Pokémon Shuffle.

Type advantages follow the standard type chart, with the exception of immunities which are changed to not very effective. (This has the effect of making most Normal types rather useless since they are not super-effective against anything.) So a match of three Water type Pokémon is super-effective against a Fire type (double damage), and a Normal type is not very effective against a ghost type (half damage). The game shows orange arrows pointing up next to Pokémon that will be super-effective on that level, and blue down arrows for those.

Abilities

Pokémon also have abilities that can help in gameplay. Abilities can do more damage in certain situations, temporarily immobilise the opponent, or clear away disruptions or other Pokémon.

Mega Pokémon

Mega Pokémon play a big role in Pokémon Shuffle. At the end of each set of levels a Mega Pokémon is encountered, who is usually quite strong. When defeated, a Mega Stone for that Pokémon is received. Pokémon placed in the first slot of the roster with their corresponding Mega Stone can Mega-Evolve during a level. Matching Mega-Evolved Pokémon scores many more points and can remove a large swathe of Pokémon.

Level-up Attack Power

This table shows what each Pokémon's Attack Power is at each level. For example, Gengar (base power 70) would have an attack of 82 at Level 6.

Most Pokémon can be raised to Level 10, which the game shows as MAX. Some Pokémon can be given the Raise Max Level item, which as the name suggests increases their maximum level and therefore their maximum power. Blastoise for example can take 5 RMLs and increase its power to 105, higher than a level 10 legendary like Palkia.

Level Base 30 Base 40 Base 50 Base 60 Base 70 Base 80 Base 90
1 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
2 35 43 53 63 73 83 93
3 39 46 56 66 76 86 96
4 42 48 58 68 78 88 98
5 45 50 60 70 80 90 100
6 47 52 62 72 82 92 102
7 49 54 64 74 84 94 104
8 51 56 66 76 86 96 106
9 53 58 68 78 88 98 108
10 55 60 70 80 90 100 110
11 61 66 75 84 93 102 112
12 67 72 80 88 96 104 114
13 73 78 85 92 99 106 116
14 79 84 90 96 102 108 118
15 85 90 100 105 110 115 120

EXP table

This tables shows how much EXP a Pokémon needs to reach the next level. More powerful Pokémon are harder to train and require more EXP per level.

If a stage is completed, each Pokémon in the roster earns EXP equal to the number of turns the stage has. In addition, the Pokémon that makes the most matches during the stage earns double EXP - this is shown by a crown icon afterwards. So for example, if Ampharos (50 turns) is beaten, one Pokémon would earn 100 EXP while the other three earn 50.

If a stage is not completed, each Pokémon earns EXP in proportion to how much damage was done. For example, if Ampharos had 20% HP remaining at the end of the 50 turns, the EXP gained would be 80% of 50, which is 40 EXP. There is no crown if the stage is not completed.

To Level Base 30 Base 40 Base 50 Base 60 Base 70 Base 80 Base 90
2 50 55 60 65 70 75 80
3 100 110 120 130 140 150 160
4 150 165 180 195 210 225 240
5 150 165 180 195 210 225 240
6 450 495 540 585 630 675 720
7 750 825 900 975 1050 1125 1200
8 900 990 1080 1170 1260 1350 1440
9 1050 1155 1260 1365 1470 1575 1680
10 1200 1320 1440 1560 1680 1800 1920
11 1350 1485 1620 1755 1890 2025 2160
12 1050 1155 1260 1365 1470 1575 1680
13 1500 1650 1800 1950 2100 2250 2400
14 1800 1980 2160 2340 2520 2700 2880
15 2100 2310 2520 2730 2940 3150 3360

Thanks to /vp/ (especially SciresM and Ritchie) for some of the information here. Git gud.