PokéBase - Pokémon Q&A
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You can transfer Pokémon from FRLG to newer games. Also better nostalgia :).
You also can have more species of Pokémon in FRLG. You can fight wild Pokémon in FRLG. You have EV's, Abilities, an held Items in FRLG. :P
Also FRLG has special punch moves, physical shadow ball, and no stealth rock.
Technically speaking, comparing LGPE to FRLG is like comparing honey and peanut butter. They're totally different, yet choosing one over the other is a case of personal preference.
FRLG was actually a challenge compared to LGPE

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The following details the major changes to Pokemon's battling mechanics that have occurred between each generation. Minor changes like alterations to a move's Base Power or a slight change in how an ability works usually will not be included, but differences in competitively relevant move mechanics (such as RBY's Hyper Beam, BW's Explosion nerf, etc.) are listed.
Changes from SM to ORAS
Burn damage is 1/8 per turn.
Paralysis multiplies speed by 1/4.
Confused Pokemon have a 50% chance of hitting themselves each time they try to move.
Mega evolution happens after turn order is determined. For example, Mega Metagross's speed increase, Mega Swampert's Swift Swim, and Mega Sableye's lack of Prankster don't affect turn order on the turn they mega evolve.
IVs are tied to Hidden Power type, so a Pokemon with any Hidden Power type other than Dark must have imperfect IVs.
Dark void is 80% accurate and works regardless of the user's species.
Destiny Bond does not fail from consecutive use.
Gale Wings works regardless of the user's HP.
Prankster-affected moves have no added immunities.
The Base Power of the second hit of a Parental Bond-boosted attack is half of the attack's Base Power.
Aerilate, Pixilate, and Refrigerate multiply the Base Power of affected attacks by 13/10, and Normalize does not change the Base Power of anything.
Soul Dew multiplies the Special Attack of Latias and Latios by 3/2 instead of powering up certain types of attacks.
Changes from ORAS to BW
Terrains and Mega Pokemon do not exist.
Grass Pokemon are affected by "Powder" and "Spore" moves.
Electric Pokemon can be paralyzed.
The Fairy type doesn't exist, and the Togepi and Clefairy families are Normal-types.
Steel resists Ghost and Dark.
Critical hits multiply the damage by 2 instead of 3/2.
Ghost Pokemon can be trapped.
The Base Power of Knock Off is 20, and doesn't increase by knocking off items.
The Base Power of Hidden Power varies from 31 to 70 due to IVs.
Substitutes do not treat sound moves and Infiltrator-affected moves differently.
Weather caused by Drizzle, Drought, Sand Stream, and Snow Warning last indefinitely.
Oblivious only prevents infatuation and captivate.
Defog doesn't remove anything on the user's side of the field.
Changes from BW to DPP
Team Preview does not exist.
A Pokemon's sleep counter does not reset when switching out. Also, sleep lasts for 1 to 4 turns rather than BW's 1 to 3.
The moves Explosion and SelfDestruct temporarily halves the opponent's Defense, effectively doubling their Base Power.
Wish heals the target by 50% of its HP, rather than 50% of the user's HP.
The trapping effects of Mean Look can be Baton Passed.
Taunt lasts for 2 to 4 turns.
Encore lasts for 3 to 7 turns.
Petal Dance, Thrash, and Outrage are paused but not disrupted if the user can't move due to sleep, freezing, or flinching.
Crash damage is half of the damage the attack would have dealt, and half of the target's max HP if the target's type makes it immune to the attack.
Tail glow raises the user's special attack by 2 stages.
Growth does not raise Attack and is unaffected by weather.
Tailwind lasts for 3 turns.
Magic Coat does not affect switching moves, entry hazards, identifying moves, Disable, Spite, Encore, Torment, Taunt, Embargo, Heal Block, and Defog.
Sturdy does not prevent OHKOs from any moves except Horn Drill, Guillotine, Fissure, and Sheer Cold.
Lightning Rod and Storm Drain don't grant immunities or raise Special Attack.
Soundproof Pokemon are immune to heal bell.
When a Synchronize Pokemon gets badly poisoned, the opponent gets regular poison.
Magic Guard Pokemon cannot be immobilized by paralysis.
Mental Herbs can only cure infatuation.
Choice items can lock a Pokemon into Trick or Switcheroo if both of the swapped items were Choice items.
Changes from DPP to ADV
All Dark, Dragon, Electric, Fire, Grass, Ice, Psychic, and Water moves are special moves. All Bug, Fighting, Flying, Ghost, Ground, Normal, Poison, Rock, and Steel moves are physical moves.
Sleep lasts for 1 to 6 turns. Sleep Talk will not always advance the sleep counter, as detailed here.
When the faster Pokemon faints, the opposing Pokemon does not get to move.
Taunt only lasts for 2 turns.
Encore lasts for 2 to 6 turns.
Counter and Mirror Coat treat Hidden Power as physical, regardless of type.
When a Pokemon faints, it gets replaced before the next Pokemon moves. If all non-fainted Pokemon have already moved, then the fainted Pokemon gets replaced before the end of the turn.
Thunder Wave does not activate Volt Absorb.
Rough Skin damage is 1/16.

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FRLG's features

Plot
201 Spoiler warning: this article may contain major plot or ending details. 201
The plot follows the same storyline as Generation I, with the player beginning in Pallet Town. After meeting Professor Oak while trying to leave for Route 1, both the player and their rival are asked by Oak to choose a starter Pokémon, Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle, from the desk near him. Oak allows the player to choose first and the rival quickly gets jealous, chooses the starter whose type is supereffective against the player's starter, then challenges the player to a battle. During this Pokémon battle Professor Oak commentates.
After the battle, Oak allows the two new Trainers to leave for their journey across Kanto. Stopping in Viridian City's Poké Mart, the player will find that a package has come in for the professor, and the clerk asks that it be delivered to him. After this has been completed the professor gives one Pokédex to the player and one to the rival, and sends them on their way. Viridian City has a Gym; however, it is locked.
From here, the player has their first encounter with other Trainers, on Route 2 and in Viridian Forest, and their first encounter with a Gym Leader: Brock the Rock-type Gym Leader of Pewter City. After his defeat, journeying along Route 3 and through Mt. Moon brings the player face to face with the regional villainous team, Team Rocket, who are attempting to extract rare Fossils from the cave. Their defeat allows the player to continue through the cave, obtain the Dome Fossil or Helix Fossil which can be regenerated into Kabuto and Omanyte, and continue onto Route 4, which leads directly into Cerulean City, where another Gym is. This one, however, is run by Misty, and specializes in Water-type Pokémon. To the north, as well, there are two routes leading up to Bill's cottage. On the way, the player is confronted with a trainer who tries to persuade them to join Team Rocket. When the player reaches Bill's cottage and frees him of his transformation into a Clefairy, he will give the player a ticket for the S.S. Anne, a luxury ship moored in Vermilion Harbor and filled with Trainers. Taking a shortcut through a house burglarized by Team Rocket, the player finally arrives at Route 5.
After traveling down Routes 5 and 6, using the Underground Path to bypass Saffron City, the player finally arrives in Vermilion. This city is home to another Pokémon Gym; however, the way to it is blocked by a small tree. The only thing to do is to show the ticket to the Sailor guarding the harbor, allowing entry into the S.S. Anne. It is here, after assisting the captain with his seasickness, that the player will obtain the first of the seven Hidden Machines available in the game, containing Cut. With this, and the Cascade Badge, the tree blocking the way to Vermilion Gym can be easily cut through, and Lt. Surge, a Gym Leader specializing in Electric-types, can be challenged. From here, Route 11 beckons, as does Diglett's Cave, through which is the only way to get back to Route 2, and a second HM, containing Flash held by one of Professor Oak's aides on Route 2. The player takes a brief detour to Pewter City's museum's back entrance which was previously blocked due to a Cut-able tree, which can now easily be bypassed. The player obtains the Old Amber in the museum. Heading back to Diglett's Cave, and to Vermilion, the player must go to Cerulean and to the east, onto Route 9 and towards the Rock Tunnel.
Rock Tunnel, a still undeveloped natural tunnel between the sections of Route 10, is pitch black inside; for this reason, Flash is recommended, but not required, for navigation of it. Finally reaching Lavender Town, the only town in Kanto without a Pokémon Gym besides Pallet, there is not much to do; the local Pokémon Tower is haunted. From here, Route 8 leads to Saffron City, but it again must be bypassed by way of another Underground Path, which has its other entrance on Route 7, on the west side of Saffron. Celadon City, the home of the fourth Gym which specializes in Grass-type Pokémon, is just a short walk further. Like the Vermilion Gym, the Celadon Gym also has a small tree blocking the way to its entrance, and an old man outside.
The Rocket Game Corner in Celadon is not what it appears to be. In fact, the Game Corner itself is merely the above-ground portion of a sprawling underground complex: the Rocket Hideout. The Team Rocket boss, Giovanni, appears for the first time here, and after his defeat, flees, leaving behind a Silph Scope. A Silph Scope is required to fully navigate the Pokémon Tower inside of Lavender Town that the player encountered earlier.
After this, the Pokémon Tower can be navigated, and the ghosts haunting it are revealed to be Gastly and Haunter. In front of the stairs to the final floor, blocking the way, is also a final spirit, that of a deceased Marowak that was killed by Team Rocket when they captured her child. Making it all the way to the top reveals Mr. Fuji held hostage by Team Rocket grunts, who will leave when they are defeated. Fuji gives away the Poké Flute, and with that, the Snorlax blocking Route 11 and Route 16 can finally be moved away. Another HM, containing Fly, can be obtained easily by cutting away a tree blocking the northern section of Route 16.
Now the player is presented with a choice of how to get to Fuchsia City. Traveling down either way the Snorlax are blocking, a faster way via Routes 16, 17, and 18 on Cycling Road, or down the Silence Bridge of Routes 12, 13, 14, and 15, inevitably brings one to the southernmost city in continental Kanto, Fuchsia City, home of Koga of the Poisonous Fuchsia Gym and the Kanto Safari Zone. The Safari Zone is currently running a contest: the person to reach a specific rest house first will win yet another HM, containing Surf. Finding the Safari Zone Warden's Gold Teeth also will have him reward the player with the final of Kanto's HMs, containing Strength.
The player then goes back to either Celadon City or Lavender Town, encountering the other Snorlax on the way back. After stopping off at the Celadon Mansion and getting some Tea, Saffron City can finally be entered. However, Team Rocket is guarding almost every door in the city, including that of the local Pokémon Gym! One of the open buildings, however, is the unofficial Fighting-type Pokémon Gym. After the player defeats the Fighting Dojo, he/she is entitled to either a Hitmonchan or a Hitmonlee. The city's centerpiece building, Silph Co.'s headquarters, has also been infiltrated by the organization, and at the top, waiting in the boardroom, is the Team Rocket Boss, Giovanni, appearing for a second time, demanding that the president give him the Master Ball that the company had developed. After his defeat, he flees.
After Team Rocket clears out of Saffron City, all buildings previously blocked are now open, as well as the Gym. The Gym Leader, Sabrina, specializes in Psychic-types. The floor, as well, is covered in warp tiles that make it difficult to navigate. After Sabrina's defeat, the player makes his/her way back to Fuchsia City again and heads out to obtain the rest of the Badges.
With six Badges in hand, and five HMs in the TM Case, finally the player can adventure onto the open sea of Routes 19 and 20. A short way across them, of course, is a minor obstacle: the Seafoam Islands. After they have been navigated through, the player can continue on Route 20 to Cinnabar Island, home of Blaine's Fire-type Gym. There are also several more facilities on the island, including one that actually revives Pokémon Fossils. After Blaine's defeat, Bill shows up again, because he needs help in a small region south of Kanto, the Sevii Islands. If the player accepts, the Seagallop Ferry will travel to One Island, where a friend of Bill's, Celio, is attempting to connect the islands' PC system to that of Kanto. During this, there is also a crisis in Two Island, where the daughter of the owner of the Joyful Game Corner has gone missing, and in Three Island where a group of invading Bikers are causing trouble. After defeating them and finding the lost girl, Lostelle, who is in Berry Forest, Bill and the player will return to Kanto, where the final Gym, that of Viridian City, lies.
Finally unlocked, the Gym, whose leader specializes in Ground-types, is revealed to be none other than the boss of Team Rocket himself, Giovanni! After his defeat, he vows to disband Team Rocket and disappears. Now with eight Badges, all that lies ahead is the Pokémon League at Indigo Plateau, conveniently at the end of Route 23.
The Elite Four await challengers, those who have proven themselves worthy by getting all eight Badges and making it through Victory Road will face them, in order. Lorelei, who trains Ice-type Pokémon is first, followed by Bruno, whose specialty is Fighting, Agatha, whose specialty is Ghost, and finally Lance, who specializes in Dragon-types. After defeating these four, the reigning Pokémon Champion challenges the player to a final battle, and the Champion is none other than the player's own rival! After his defeat, Oak arrives and tells the player that they won because they care better for their Pokémon, and the player's current party are added to the Hall of Fame.
Post-game
After the credits roll, the player is back in Pallet Town. Professor Oak will have the player come to his lab to check on the Pokédex, if the player has obtained at least 60 Pokémon he will then upgrade it to the National Pokédex, in which he will then ask the player to go back to the Sevii Islands to encounter Pokémon that Professor Oak has never before seen.
There is some more work that Celio needs to do on his network machine, as he wishes to link to yet another region. The signal, however, is not strong enough, and he needs the Ruby and the Sapphire, two items found in the Sevii Islands, to strengthen it. The Ruby is found deep in a cave in Mt. Ember, which Team Rocket grunts have been seen fooling around with. The Sapphire lies at the deepest part of the Dotted Hole in Ruin Valley. The Ruby can be given to Celio without a hitch; however, the Sapphire, when found, is stolen by a Scientist named Gideon, who takes it back to Team Rocket's warehouse in the Five Isle Meadow. By infiltrating the warehouse and defeating the remaining Rocket Admins, they realize that Giovanni has disbanded Team Rocket. They do, however, vow to return one day, and bring Team Rocket back to its former glory. Gideon reluctantly gives back the Sapphire, and after this, trades are possible with the Hoenn-based Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald. The Elite Four can once again be challenged, and their Pokémon are 12 levels higher, with some of them possessing new Pokémon. In addition, Cerulean Cave is now open, and the powerful Mewtwo can be found there. Entei, Suicune, or Raikou will also begin roaming the Kanto region, depending on whether the player chose Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle, respectively, as their starter Pokémon.

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Blurb
Set off on a grand adventure to fulfill your dreams of becoming a Pokémon Master! Explore the Kanto region and discover wild Pokémon around every corner. Build your Pokémon collection and train and battle your way to success—earn your badges as you develop winning strategies to use against experienced Gym Leaders in every town. Explore every inch to uncover amazing secrets that will help you in your quest to be the very best trainer ever!
Trade, battle, and chat wirelessly! All new Wireless Adapter comes packed in every game, so trainers can trade, battle, and chat between their FireRed and LeafGreen versions with no cables!
Catch loads of Pokémon in never-before-seen island areas!
Expand your collection when you trade with a friend. Link up with Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire or Pokémon Colosseum to catch them all!
Changes from Pokémon Red and Green
Gameplay
The battle screen
Players can now play as a female character as an alternative to the male character, which was the only option in Generation I.
A resume feature was introduced, allowing players to remember the four most important events they achieved in the games the last time they were played. After entering the Hall of Fame, the resume feature displays the last four notable things the player has done recently instead of showing a specific event.
A game introduction feature, which explains the controls of the game, was added. This feature continued to appear in all games in Generation IV.
A help feature was added that can be activated by pressing the L or R buttons on the console. There is also another help feature in the form of the Teachy TV, which is given by an old man in Viridian City.
A new southern region, the Sevii Islands, is accessible, where Generation II Pokémon can be caught. Notably, most of these Pokémon cannot be found in Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald.
Bite, Sand-Attack, Karate Chop, and Gust have changed types.
Team Rocket has an expanded role in the game's post-game storyline, with a new base in the Sevii Islands.
Pokémon can breed in the Pokémon Day Care in Four Island. The daycare on Route 5 remains, but it is still limited to only caring for one Pokémon at a time.
The Ability Pickup has been modified from Ruby and Sapphire, which also includes that some of the Berries from those versions can be picked up in FireRed and LeafGreen. This is due to the inability to grow Berries in Kanto. The other Berries can only be collected by trading Pokémon from those versions as well as Emerald.
A man is present in a house in Cerulean City and will help create Berry Powder via Berry Crush. This powder can then be exchanged for rare and valuable items.
Trainers outdoors can be rebattled using the Vs. Seeker.
Information on major characters, such as Gym Leaders, is recorded in the Fame Checker.
Three additional aides for Professor Oak have been added to reward the player with items that were introduced in Generations II and III, while a returning aide now gives out the Exp. Share, the upgraded version of the Generation I item Exp. All.
Pokémon movelists are updated to include moves introduced in Generation II and Generation III.
The TM list is shared with other Generation III games. In addition, Move Tutors become available to teach moves formerly contained in Generation I TMs.
The Elite Four and Champion can be rebattled, and acquire Generation II Pokémon on their teams after the Sevii Islands quest has been completed.
Blast Burn, Frenzy Plant, and Hydro Cannon are available as Move Tutor moves at Cape Brink on Two Island. They can only be taught to the final evolved form of the player's starter Pokémon, or other members of that same species.
There is a new minigame corner, the Joyful Game Corner, on Two Island, where players can connect together, along with Emerald, and can play multiplayer minigames (Pokémon Jump and Dodrio Berry Picking) over the wireless communication system. This feature becomes usable after the events at Three Island.
Cerulean Cave in these games is very similar to the one in Red and Green. The only difference is the Generation III addition of Rock Smash boulders.
The music has been remixed to take advantage of the Game Boy Advance's power; however, the themes themselves remain the same (including a few Gold/Silver/Crystal themes being utilized in Islands Four to Seven of the Sevii Islands).
However, the Power Plant background music has been changed. In the original games, it played the Rocket Hideout theme, while in FireRed and LeafGreen, it plays the Pokémon Mansion theme.
In the original games, while battling the Elite Four, only the battle with Lance used the Gym Leader background music; the standard Trainer background music was used for the other three Elite Four members. However, in FireRed and LeafGreen, the Gym Leader background music is used for all four Elite Four members.
In the original games, when Professor Oak congratulates the player after becoming the Pokémon League Champion, a slower version of the Viridian/Pewter/Saffron City background music plays. However, in FireRed and LeafGreen, a happier-toned version of the Pallet Town background music plays when Professor Oak appears to congratulate the player.
Pokémon
As in all Generation III games, Pokémon now have natures, Abilities, and genders, and can hold items.
Magnemite and Magneton now are Electric/Steel, as they have been since Generation II. In the original Red and Green games, they were pure Electric-type.
Pokémon retain their Generation II and III evolutionary lines (e.g. Golbat can evolve into Crobat), but cannot evolve into these new stages until after the player has obtained the National Pokédex. Eevee is the only exception to this, since Espeon and Umbreon cannot be obtained due to the lack of a clock system in the game, and trading between the other Generation III games is required to obtain them.
Ponyta and Magmar (LeafGreen only) have been moved to new locations. Ponyta is now located on One Island's Kindle Road, and Magmar is now at Mt. Ember. In Generation I, they were both found in the Pokémon Mansion on Cinnabar Island.
Deoxys debuts two new forms: Attack Forme (FireRed) and Defense Forme (LeafGreen), which appear exclusively in the respective games.
Moltres has moved from its original location in Victory Road to Mt. Ember. Cerulean Cave, where Mewtwo resides, now requires Rock Smash for navigation, and it cannot be entered until after the post-game mission in the Sevii Islands has been completed.
One of Johto's legendary beasts (Raikou, Entei, or Suicune) will roam around Kanto after completing the Network Machine quest on the Sevii Islands during the post-game. The beast that appears is the one that has a type advantage over the player's starter Pokémon.
Game-exclusive Pokémon and wild Pokémon distribution have been altered from the original games to account for new evolutions released in Generation II.
Mankey and Meowth, originally game-exclusive, are now available in both games, while Psyduck, Shellder, Slowpoke, and Staryu have become game-exclusives. Due to this change, Lickitung, which was originally available through an in-game trade by trading Slowbro in both Red and Blue, now is traded for Golduck in FireRed or Slowbro in LeafGreen.
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LGPE's features

Features
The starter Pokémon in this game, Partner Pokémon, Pikachu and Eevee, have higher base stats compared to the regular ones, in addition of having all-perfect 31 IVs. Their gender can be determined by the title screen during the start of game. Unlike the regular Eevee, which does not have any gender differences, the female starter Eevee has a unique heart-shaped pattern around the tip of their tail.
Pikachu, like in all core series games since Pokémon X and Y, is voiced by Ikue Ohtani, while Eevee is voiced by Aoi Yūki.[3]
The Joy-Con is used to catch Pokémon by flicking one's wrist in a throwing motion, similar to the method in Pokémon GO. While in handheld mode, wild Pokémon are caught by aiming the Poké Ball with motion controls. Wild Pokémon, except for interactive Pokémon, can no longer be battled in a traditional sense, but NPC Trainers can be battled as normal.
Two-player simultaneous play feature, which can be done by sharing one of the Joy-Con controllers. Both players can adventure at the same time and one of them may lend a hand by joining in battles against NPC Trainers. This feature also increases the chances of catching Pokémon successfully by throwing Poké Balls together at the wild Pokémon.
An accessory called the Poké Ball Plus can be used to catch Pokémon in place of a Joy-Con. Like the Pokéwalker, a Pokémon can be taken on the go and be interacted with for rewards when returned to the game. It also contains the Mythical Pokémon Mew, a special Pokémon that cannot be obtained by normal gameplay.
The introduction of two new Mythical Pokémon: Meltan and its evolved form, Melmetal.
Once the player has become the Champion, Master Trainers will appear and can be found scattered throughout the Kanto region. They are considered the strongest Trainers for every Pokémon species in Generation I and can be spotted by the icon of the Pokémon they favor above their heads. In these battles, the player are only allowed to use one Pokémon which is the same species as them and any medicines are prohibited.
Alterations from other core series games
The games only feature the 151 Pokémon of Generation I, the new Mythical Pokémon Meltan and its evolution Melmetal. Players can also import the Alolan forms of these Pokémon from Pokémon GO or receive them from in-game trades repeatedly.
The games are no longer backwards compatible with any other main series games, unlike every other main series game released since Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen.
In addition to customizing the player's color skin and clothing, the starter Pokémon can also be dressed in different outfits and be given different accessories and hair styles.
Wild Pokémon now appear on the overworld. Coming into contact with one will engage them. They may appear with either a red or blue aura, which indicates their size, either being larger or smaller, respectively, than their own standard size. Similar to the previous games, there is a chance to encounter Shiny Pokémon in the wild.
A feature called the Catch Combo tracks how many of the same species of Pokémon is caught in a row without the Pokémon running away or the game turning off. The higher the combo, the stronger and rarer wild Pokémon become, and Shiny Pokémon become more common.
The day and night cycle, several moves (including all Z-Moves), Abilities, several items, held items, breeding, and Eggs have been removed from the game.
Moves that were introduced in Generation I are all available in the games.
Abilities were going to appear in the games, as they are programmed into them, but they were removed, leaving them unused.
The only available Poké Ball that were not introduced in Generation I are Premier Ball and Cherish Ball.
Teleport has been changed to do something in any kind of battle, as opposed to just battles with wild Pokémon.
Premier Ball can be obtained as gift by purchasing 10 Poké Balls at the Poké Mart.
Calculations for stats have been changed, allowing for Pokémon to reach much higher stat ceilings than in previous core games.
Effort values (EVs) have been replaced by awakening values (AVs), which can be raised by feeding specific Candy.
High friendship can boost all stats by up to 10%, before adding in AVs.
The Bicycle, one of the key items in Generation I and III, has been removed; the Miracle Cycle shop in Cerulean City is replaced with the home of a Bike Maniac who just collects many kinds of bikes; and the Cycling Road is redesigned as the "Pokémon Road" without any Bikers or Roughnecks challenging the player.
A unique section of the Bag called the Candy Jar is used for increasing the stats of Pokémon by giving them various types of Candy obtained from transferring Pokémon to Professor Oak, similar to the Candy from Pokémon GO.
A section in the bag called the Pokémon Box replaces PCs, allowing players to switch the Pokémon in their party at any point in the game.
The player can no longer play mini-game on the machines in the Celadon Game Corner because the service desk has run out of coins. However, there are certain spots where the hidden items such as Bottle Caps are recurring once per day in the Game Corner.
The Safari Zone in Fuchsia City replaces the zoo, and has added the GO Park, where the player is able to interact with their caught Pokémon. Similar to the Box system in the Pokémon Storage System, the GO Park complex has a total of 20 GO Parks, with each capable of holding 50 Pokémon. Thus, the player can transfer up to 1,000 Pokémon into the games.
If the player has gathered 25 of the same species of Pokémon, they can play a minigame in the Park's Play Yard for Candy. Alolan forms are counted as a separate species, listed in red.
Exclusive new moves are available for the starter Pikachu and Eevee. Pikachu can to learn Zippy Zap, Splishy Splash and Floaty Fall, while Eevee can learn Bouncy Bubble, Buzzy Buzz, Sizzly Slide, Glitzy Glow, Baddy Bad, Sappy Seed, Freezy Frost and Sparkly Swirl. These moves can be learned from a Move Tutor in the Pokémon Centers of Cerulean City, Celadon City, and Fuchsia City.
The starter Pikachu and Eevee can activate their own partner powers in battle once they have high enough friendship. If activated while they are in battle, they use an exclusive move—Pika Papow or Veevee Volley—which increases in damage based on friendship. If activated while they are not in battle, they boost the stats of the current Pokémon.
TMs have been reordered and readded with some moves that previously available as Move Tutor. The amount of TM moves available also have been decreased compared to previous core series games.
HM moves have been replaced by Secret Techniques that the starter Pikachu and Eevee can use in the overworld, but do not take up move slots. These include Chop Down for Cut, Sea Skim for Surf, and Sky Dash for Fly.
Interactive Pokémon such as Electrode, Snorlax, and Legendary Pokémon can be battled, but they must be defeated to be captured. A five-minute time limit is in effect for the battle. If the timer hits 0, the battle ends abruptly. Hitting the Home button or putting the console in sleep mode does not pause the timer.
Electrode disguised as items are now white on top and red at the bottom, just like real Electrode.
Both Snorlax are battled with either an Attack or Defense stat boost, while all the Legendary Pokémon have all their stats increased, similar to Totem Pokémon.
The legendary birds (Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres) can be encountered as the wild Pokémon in the sky after beating the Champion for the first time.
Legendary Pokémon captured in this game are no longer guaranteed to have 3 perfect IVs.

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Returning features
The eight Gym Leaders of Kanto and their Badges, as well as the Elite Four of the Indigo Plateau, return.
The rematch battle of all Gym Leaders, the Elite Four, and the Champion after entering the Hall of Fame, also return.
Team Rocket returns, including the trio from the anime series, Jessie, James, and Meowth. Unlike in their game debut Pokémon Yellow, Jessie and James engage the player in Double Battles.
The starter Pokémon have similar traits to the Pokémon Yellow. In this case, starter Pikachu and Eevee, unlike ones found in the wild, prefer to be out of its Poké Ball and have no interest in evolving.
The starter Pikachu and Eevee also react differently near the hidden items by wagging their own tail.
A feature that allow the player to pet a Pokémon similarly to Pokémon-Amie and Pokémon Refresh, can be called by pressing "Play with Pikachu/Eevee" on the menu. However, this feature is limited to the starter Pikachu and Eevee.
Any Pokémon that the player has in their party can follow them outside their Poké Balls, as well as their action and reaction depending on the environment, like they did in Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver. However, the Pokémon that walks outside of its Poké Ball can now be chosen out of the party.
Certain Pokémon appears to be ridden in the certain locations instead of following the player. These Pokémon includes Charizard, Persian (Kantonian form only), Machamp, Arcanine, Rapidash, Dodrio, Haunter, Onix, Rhyhorn, Rhydon, Kangaskhan, Starmie, Tauros, Gyarados, Lapras, Aerodactyl, Snorlax, and Dragonite.
Only Gyarados and Lapras cannot appear outside unless they are in the sea.
After entering the Hall of Fame for the first time, Charizard, Aerodactyl, and Dragonite can be ridden across the Kanto region; however they cannot enter the secluded places. This allows the player to encounter and catch the wild Pokémon in the sky.
Mega Evolutions of Generation I Pokémon (Venusaur, Charizard, Blastoise, Beedrill, Pidgeot, Alakazam, Slowbro, Gengar, Kangaskhan, Pinsir, Gyarados, Aerodactyl, and Mewtwo), as well as their corresponding Mega Stones, return. As Pokémon are no longer able to hold an item, Mega Stones can be activated in the Bag instead. Only Mega Stones belonging to Kanto starter Pokémon can be obtained prior entering the Hall of Fame.
Storyline changes from Generations I and III
201    Spoiler warning: this article may contain major plot or ending details.    201
The game features entirely new protagonists, Chase and Elaine, instead of Red, and the role of Blue is replaced with a new friendly rival, Trace.
The player and their rival receive their Pokédex and first Poké Balls along with their starter Pokémon and no longer battle until returning to Professor Oak to deliver his parcel.
Team Rocket appears early in the Viridian City, replaces the old man as the obstacle keeping the player from progressing to Route 2. They later can be found in the Pokémon Road in Route 17 after the disbandment of Team Rocket.
Unlike in Pokémon Yellow, Team Rocket's Meowth no longer battles.
Mina, a Fairy-type Pokémon Trainer from Alola, is visiting Kanto and can be found in the Vermilion Port.
Lorelei appears early during the Team Rocket Grunt's raid near the Pokémon Center on Route 10.
After killing the Cubone's mother in Lavender Town, Team Rocket kidnaps Cubone and takes it back to the Team Rocket Hideout. They also push away the Team Rocket Grunt blocking access to Silph Co.. Cubone is later adopted into Trace's team after being rescued.
Instead of battling the ghost of Cubone's mother, she is calmed by the presence of her child, Cubone, and then departs.
Archer, a Team Rocket Executive who was introduced in Generation II and given a name in Generation IV, appears during the story.
The player instead meets Red, Blue, and, for the first time as a non-player character, Green over the course of their adventure.
Red only appears in the Indigo Plateau outside of the Pokémon League after the player beating at least six Master Trainers.
Blue appears early in the Pewter City and later in the Silph Co. during the raid of Team Rocket. Similar to the storyline prior to Generation II, Blue takes over as the Gym Leader of Viridian Gym after the player beats the Champion.
Green can be found in Cerulean Cave, searching for Mewtwo, and later reappears in Cerulean City.